Templates and checklists

Introduction

This is a collection of templates and checklists to be used with the various books in this series. Each section opens with an introduction about the purpose of the section. Each template or checklist has a brief description, instructions and download options.

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Overview

The templates in this section will help you:

  • to scan text and note the information that is interesting or that you want
  • to keep your purpose for reading clearly in your mind so that you can capture ideas more easily
  • to remember to use your own best ways to think and the reading techniques that work well for you
  • to make notes as you read so that you read much more effectively
  • collect interesting ideas together in a way that allows you to find them later.
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Template  – files for downloading

Descriptions & Instructions

Template format

A1 Jotting down as you scan

pdf

pdf docx

A2 Bookmark – purpose 

pdf

pdf

A3 Bookmark – profile and techniques 

pdf

pdf

A4 Jotting down as you read 

pdf

pdf docx

A5 Collecting ideas that interest you 

pdf

pdf docx

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Template – files for downloading

Descriptions & Instructions

Template format

A1 Jotting down as you scan

pdf

pdf docx

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Scanning and finding information are both more effective when you are aware of why you are scanning, or of the information that you are searching for.


Reading is more effective after good scanning.

The template has some prompts at the top to help you scan more effectively.


The template is two A4 pages with lines. It has space to write the title of the material and the date when you are scanning.

It can be printed double-sided or single-sided by selecting the appropriate settings on your printer.

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  • Select the appropriate settings on your printer if you want a single page; for double- sided printing, select flipping or binding on the long edge, or equivalent option.

  • Decide what you are looking for before you start scanning.
  • If you have no personal aim in mind, it might be helpful to decide to look for the author’s main ideas.
  • Be as specific as you can; this will give your mind a chance to retain the information.

  • Write the details of the material at the top and the date when you start using the page.
  • Keep using the prompts at the top of the page to keep your focus.
  • If other prompts work better for you, include them, or put them on one of the bookmark templates.
  • Include the page number of the ideas as you note them.
  • If you don’t like writing words, try using symbols or diagrams or drawings.
  • Give yourself permission to ignore spelling, so long as you come back to the notes while you can still remember what they mean.

  • Remember that you are scanning and only start reading if it is really the right time to do so.

  • As you finish, see if you can give a priority rating to the ideas. Which are the main ideas? Which are most important to you?
  • Put the notes away where you can find them again.
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Template  – files for downloading

Descriptions & Instructions

Template format

A2 Bookmark – purpose

pdf

pdf

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Reading is assisted when you are aware of the reason you are reading.

This template is one way of being very deliberate about your purpose for reading.


It is two A4 pages that should be printed double-sided, to create 3 bookmarks that can be used to assist reading the books in this series.

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  • 3 bookmarks can be made from this template.
  • Print the pages double-sided, flipping on the short side, or equivalent option.
  • Use stiff paper or card, if you have it.
  • Then cut along the dotted lines.

  • The bookmarks are for you to write on as you use the books in this series.
  • They are intended to help you make the most of your reading.
  • You can write anything you learn about your way of reading.
  • They have reminders about the meanings of the boxes.
  • You can record your purpose for reading, anything you find interesting.
  • You can make notes on the bookmarks.
  • Putting notes like this on the bookmarks will help you stay on task as you read.

  • By capturing the ideas as you read, you should be able to remember more of what you are reading.
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Template  – files for downloading

Descriptions & Instructions

Template format

A3 Bookmark – profile and techniques

pdf

pdf

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This template provides 3 bookmarks which allow you to record your dyslexic/ SpLD profile and the techniques you can use to help your reading.


You can make reading a much more satisfying activity by being aware of what helps you read and what helps you to minimise the pitfalls of your dyslexia/ SpLD.

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  • 3 bookmarks can be made from this template.
  • Print the pages double-sided, flipping on the short side, or equivalent option.
  • Use stiff paper or card, if you have it.
  • Then cut along the dotted lines.

  • The purpose of these bookmarks is to remind you of anything that helps you to read more effectively.

  • Under ‘this text’ record your purpose for reading this book.
  • Highlight or tick those techniques that you like using.

  • Decide whether you are going to take notes and how long you want to keep them.
  • Remind yourself of the note-taking methods you have found best to use.
  • Decide how you are going to keep your notes organised; they need to be useful to you.
  • Record the source details in your notes.
  • Record the page number against every note.

  • You might want to try some of the other techniques, if your reading is not as effective as you know it can be.
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Template  – files for downloading

Descriptions & Instructions

Template format

A4 Jotting down as you read

pdf

pdf docx

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This is a template that helps you 1) to read in an efficient and effective way and 2) to capture the ideas that you have gathered from the text. It is 2 identical, A4 pages with prompts at the top.

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The template has 2 pages which you can print either as single-sided or double-sided by choosing the right settings on your printer.


For each section that you read, note the chapter, section and page(s), and then write notes using the prompts 1 – 4. If there are any other prompts that you find help your reading, add them to the list.


Note 1

Good preparation for reading can significantly increase the ease with which you read. Knowing your reason to read will switch your mind on so that it will more easily retain the information you are reading.


Note 2 & 3

Assessing 1) the ideas you have just read and 2) what further questions you have will help you to recall the information as you read further on the topic.


Note 4

Deciding what you need to know next can help you to build up your knowledge in the most effective way without wasting time reading material that is not so relevant.

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Template  – files for downloading

Descriptions & Instructions

Template format

A5 Collecting ideas that interest you

pdf

pdf docx

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This is a landscape template that allows you to record information that interests you. The template allows you to separate the ideas contained in the book from your own comments.


The template has 2 narrower columns on the right hand side that you can use to follow a single idea when you want to. The template doesn’t have horizontal lines so that you can write as much or as little as you want for each idea.

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If you keep notes from your reading in A4 ring binders and you use double-sided printing, choose ‘flip on the long edge’ for your printer settings.


Draw a horizontal line after each idea to keep the ideas separate.


Source: enter which book you are working with, or any other source of ideas that are interesting to you. Enter the date you start working with the book. Use different sheets for different books.


Chapter, section, page and date: record the information for each insight you enter. The date when the information is recorded is often useful too.


Summaries of ideas: briefly write what has attracted your attention; you don’t need to write in full if you have recorded where the ideas can be found. Put quote marks round any text that you copy word for word.


How and or why the ideas interest you: describe how the ideas interest you.


Note any theme or key words: note the main key words, or themes, in the fourth column. You will then be able to select the ideas that belong together without having to read all your notes. You will be able to work on one theme at a time as you explore further.


Priorities: this column can be used to show the relative importance of the ideas or your priority for going further with this idea or any other way that you want to assess priority.

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Overview

Each dyslexic/ SpLD person has their own Individual, Personal Profile of Dyslexia/ SpLD and their own Regime for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD.


Once you know your profile and regime, you are much better able to maximise what you can do well and keep the hindrance of your dyslexia/ SpLD to a minimum.


The templates in this section will help you:

  • record and identify aspects of your profile of dyslexia/ SpLD
  • explore how well you can use your strengths and strategies
  • monitor your progress in living confidently with dyslexia/ SpLD.

The templates to build your Profile and Regime are in Template Sections C and D respectively.

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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

Template format

B1 Collecting ideas that relate to you

pdf

pdf docx

B2 Know your own mind

pdf

pdf

B3 Compare expectations and reality

pdf

pdf docx

B4 Action, results, next step

pdf

pdf docx

B5 Recording template – 4 columns, one for coding

pdf (B5-B8)

pdf docx

B6 Recording template ‑ 4 equal columns

pdf docx

B7 Recording template ‑ 5 columns, one for coding

pdf docx

B8 Recording template ‑ 5 equal columns

pdf docx

B9 A calendar month for prioritising – 5 weeks

pdf

pdf docx

B10 Questions to ask oneself to help observation

pdf

pdf docx

B11 Monitoring progress

pdf

pdf docx

B12 Questions to ask a child to explore inner thinking

pdf

pdf docx

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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

Template format

B1 Collecting ideas that relate to you

pdf

pdf docx

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This is a landscape template that allows you to record insights about your dyslexia/ SpLD. The more insights you know about your dyslexia/ SpLD, the more you can make choices to maximise your potential and minimise any un-useful effects from your dyslexia/ SpLD.


The template has two narrow columns on the right hand side (RHS) that you can use to identify whether the insight relates to your profile or your regime and which element of either is concerned.

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If you keep notes about your insights in A4 ring binders, and you use double-sided printing, choose ‘flip on the long edge’ for your printer settings.


Source: enter which book you are working with, or any other source of ideas that lead to ideas about your dyslexia/ SpLD.


Chapter, section, page and date: record the information for each insight you enter.  The date is often useful too.


From the book .. ideas..: briefly write what has attracted your attention; you don’t need to write in full if you have recorded where the ideas can be found.


How and why ...: describe how the ideas relate to your experience and what they are telling you about yourself.


Managing SpLD/ Profile: note whether the insight is part of your profile and/ or your management regime.


Element: record the element of your dyslexia/ SpLD management or profile that is involved.


Further exploration: using the RHS columns, you can pull together insights that belong together.

You can then work systematically with different elements to increase the management of your dyslexia/ SpLD and your enjoyment of your capabilities.

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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

Template format

B2 Know your own mind

pdf

pdf

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There are three ways to use this template, to:

  • brain storm
  • train your mind to stay focussed in a chosen direction
  • find out more about the way your mind works - Know Your Own Mind.

It is an A4 page with a central area, in which you write a topic or theme, and spokes all around for you to gather ideas connected to the central idea.


Other useful materials:

Recordings:

Know Your Own Mind – Exercise
Know Your Own Mind – Example


Templates:

E1: List of Options for Thinking Preferences
E7: The Box ‘Other’

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Brain storming

  • The template can be used as a straight forward brain-storming page.
  • You write the topic you want to think about in the centre; it can be quite complex.
  • You write down ideas that come into your mind.  You might group them in some organised way, if that seems the right thing to do.
  • At some stage, you will run out of ideas.
  • Then you consider what the brain storm has shown you: What connections appear?   Is there any missing information?  What should you do next?  How has your understanding changed?

Train your mind to stay focussed

  • Choose an everyday object or idea, e.g. ‘cup’ or ‘red’;  keep the idea or object fairly simple.  Write it in the middle of the template.
  • Write associated ideas round the circle, like spokes of a wheel. 
  • After each associated idea, bring your mind back to the central idea.

  • The ideas that you write around the central focus should all be directly connected to that focus.  You should not allow your mind to wander away from the central idea.

  • You keep putting down connected ideas until you run out.
  • Then you stay with the central idea, in whatever way suits you, for another 5 minutes.
  • Every time a new idea comes, the 5 minute ending pause starts again.
  • In this way, you learn to focus your mind on the chosen idea or object.
  • Attention like this is very useful in dealing with dyslexia/ SpLD.

Know Your Own Mind

  • You can do this exercise using the recording Know Your Own Mind – Exercise.
  • Choose an everyday object or idea, e.g. ‘cup’ or ‘red’;  keep the idea or object fairly simple.  Write it in the middle of the template.
  • Write associated ideas round the circle, like spokes of a wheel. 
  • After each associated idea, bring your mind back to the central idea.

  • The ideas that you write around the central focus should all be directly connected to that focus.  You should not allow your mind to wander away from the central idea.

(Up to this point, Training Your Mind to Stay Focused and Know Your Own Mind have the same instructions.)


  • Stop after a couple of minutes.
  • Then add the reasons why you thought of the ideas that you wrote down:
    • What was linking the different ideas together?
    • Was there any significance in the way you added ideas?
    • What common threads can you see? 
    • How did you remember the ideas: visually, verbally, through experience, etc.

  • The map you have produced can be analysed using Thinking Preferences; those that you use are part of your dyslexia/ SpLD profile. 
  • The map may also show Thinking Preferences that don’t work for you and which you should not attempt to use.
  • The template E1: List of Options for Thinking Preferences can be used to help you identify your different thinking preferences.
  • Use template E7: The Box ‘Other’ to capture any details that don’t fit with an identified way of thinking.

On the website:


In the series:

  • Book 1 has further discussion of interpretation of the mind exercise. 
  • Book 2 , Book 3 and Book 4 all use the results of finding out how your mind works.

NB: be positive.  You need to have a positive attitude to finding out how your mind thinks.  For example, you could become very critical of the traits of your dyslexia/ SpLD.  You will make more progress if your approach is more like: “Oh! That’s what happens.  I wonder if there’s a strategy for that.”

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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

Template format

B3 Compare expectations and reality

pdf

pdf docx

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This template is a table in which to write down your expectations of a situation, what happened and to make some comments about the comparison.


Using a template like this helps you to be objective about situations.


It is two landscape A4 pages which can be printed back to back.

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  • Select the appropriate settings on your printer if you want a single page; for double-sided printing, select flipping or binding on the long edge.

  • Situation: give an overall name to the situation

  • Event column: give a brief description of the situation.

  • Expected column: write down what you thought would happen.  It can be helpful to include any reasons behind your expectations.

  • Actual column: describe what happened as objectively as possible.  If you have specific emotional responses to the event, include them too, but keep them separate from what happened.

  • Comment column: in this column, you can write any reflections you have when you look at what you have written in the other columns.
  • Frequently, this way of approaching events shows something that is not registering in your conscious thinking and it is often very helpful to be objective in this way.
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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

Template format

B4 Action, results, next step

pdf

pdf docx

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A useful way to make progress is by recording your actions in a situation, what results occurred and then reflecting what you would like to try next time.


The template format is tabular for easy comparison; it contains two identical, A4 landscape pages.

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  • Select the appropriate settings on your printer if you want a single page; for double-sided printing, select flipping or binding on the long edge.

  • Date and Event columns: use these columns to record sufficient details.

  • Action: describe what you were doing. 

  • Results: describe the results of your actions.

  • Next step: looking at your actions and the results:  Are you pleased with the results, or not?  What would you like to try another time?  Is there anything you need in order to make the change?

  • Progress comes when you start to be objective about situations that happen.  You can learn where your strengths lie and what would make the difference to the way your dyslexia/ SpLD impacts on your life.
  • This template is useful for monitoring your progress as you develop new understanding and skills.
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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

Template format

B5 Recording template – 4 columns, one for coding

pdf (B5-B8)

pdf docx

B6 Recording template ‑ 4 equal columns

pdf docx

B7 Recording template ‑ 5 columns, one for coding

pdf docx

B8 Recording template ‑ 5 equal columns

pdf docx

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Tabular formats for recording information, or notes, often allow clear separation between different sections of the information.

The templates can be used to record many different types of information.


Coding the information allows it to be recognised easily so that clusters of information can be brought together for further use. 


When you are recommended to use these templates in the books, headings are given.


Each templates has two identical, landscape pages.

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  • Select the appropriate settings on your printer if you want a single page; for double-sided printing, select flipping or binding on the long edge if you want to keep the pages in an A4 ring binder.

  • Title and date: deciding on a title can help you to keep focussed; the date is easier to put in at the time of writing the information; it may be important later.

  • Headings: choose brief headings that represent the essential points of the columns.

  • Codes: codes can be key words, abbreviations or symbols.  It might be helpful to write them at the bottom of the page so that you don’t forget your system.

  • Separate entries: draw a line under each entry to keep them separate.

  • Using the templates: the overall purpose of these templates is to capture information in a systematic way that allows you to look for patterns in situations, behaviour, ideas, etc.  How you work with the patterns will depend on what you want to achieve.
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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

Template format

B9 A calendar month for prioritising – 5 weeks

pdf

pdf docx

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This template is very useful for sorting out priorities and the amount of time available for specific tasks.


It is a single landscape page with 5 weeks by 7 days.

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  • Print more than one page if necessary.

  • Month and year: fill these in.  I often use a highlighter to mark the boundary between months, when appropriate.

  • Tasks: write down the reasons for using the template.

  • Fill in the dates. you might just put the Monday dates in, or the weekend ones; or you can fill in all the dates.  It is better to put in more than you think you need.

  • Filling in the days: put down everything that is happening, including time away, time to visit friends, time to go shopping: anything that occupies some time.
  • Make the entries brief so that they will fit in.
  • You can write entries with time slots attached or position them approximately according to the time of day when they will happen.
  • Be very realistic, or slightly pessimistic, about the length of time anything will take.

  • Assessing time and priorities: when you have finished filling everything in, see how much time you have available for what you want to do, or must do.
  • You can take a photocopy if you need to move entries around, then you don’t lose the first set.  I often work in pencil so that I can rub out to make changes.
  • Seeing how little time is really available is often helpful when the deadline for a task seems a long way ahead.
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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

Template format

B10 Questions to ask oneself to help observation

pdf

pdf docx

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The template is a set of questions that help you notice what is happening in a particular situation.


It is a single, landscape A4 page.

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  • Enter the date and the reason for finding out what is going on.
  • Answer the questions as objectively as you can.
  • Do you think the questions have covered all the issues?
  • If not add more questions.
  • Decide what the answers are showing you.
  • What do you want to do next?.
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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

Template format

B11 Monitoring progress

pdf

pdf docx

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It is easy to think you aren’t making progress unless you specifically capture what you have achieved. Progress is also helped by having clear ideas about future changes that you want to make.


This template allows you to assess your progress. It is two landscape A4 pages with columns.

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  • Select the appropriate settings on your printer if you want a single page; for double-sided printing, select flipping or binding on the long edge if you want to use an A4 ring binder.

  • You probably want to find out how you are progressing with a skill or some task for which you are learning processes.  It might be several things at a time.
  • Choose whether to use separate sheets for different skills or tasks or whether to mix up the skills and tasks and work in date order.

  • Date: put the date in for each entry, then you can see your progress over time.
  • After each entry: draw a line to keep entries separate.

  • Skill / task: in this column briefly describe the skill or task.

  • What you do/ what is working: as objectively as possible, describe how you go about using the skill or doing the task.

  • How easy/ difficult is it?: think about how well you think you are using the skill or doing task.  If you think you are doing badly, remember you can’t make progress without seeing where you’ve got to.

  • What next?: write down what you would like to try next or any help that you need.
  • Also write how you will make the next step happen.
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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

Template format

B12 Questions to ask a child to explore inner thinking

pdf

pdf docx

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This template has some questions that help an adult to explore thinking with a child.


The template is a single, landscape A4 page with a table of questions and space to write answers.

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  • Enter the child’s name and the date and agree some situation or task to talk about.

  • Don’t stop at the first answer, try to find out how the child thinks his/ her way through doing anything.  You want to find out what connections his/ her mind makes easily.
  • You want to find out why he/ she thinks anything makes something difficult.
  • You want to end with some ideas to try with the child to help him/ her find easier ways to do anything that is being difficult.

  • It might be that he/ she just needs support to use alternative thinking strengths that will work very well.
  • The Selected Highlights entry: Know Your Own Mind – Exercise from a Workshop has several contributions with explanations showing how several adults use different thinking strategies.
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Overview

You can build the profile of your dyslexia/ SpLD as you understand more about the way your mind works well and how your dyslexia/ SpLD impacts on your life.


The ideas relating to the profile are developed in Book 1 . They are also covered in Appendix 2 in all 4 books of the series.

Templates for gaining insights about your profile can be found in Template Section B.

Ideas for testing the insights of your profile can be found in Book 2 and Book 3 .

Book 4 covers the pitfall element of your profile.


Templates in this section:

  • C1 and C3 are blank templates for those who like spatial or linear formats respectively.
  • C2 is an example in the spatial format.
  • C4 has 2 examples in the linear format.
  • Whichever format you choose to use, look at all the examples to see some insights from other people.
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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

template format

C1 Individual, personal profile of dyslexia/ SpLD – spatial

pdf (C1 & C2)

pdf

C2 Example Individual, personal profile of dyslexia/ SpLD – spatial 

pdf

C3 Individual, personal profile of dyslexia/ SpLD – linear  

pdf (C3 & C4)

pdf docx

C4 Two Examples of Individual, personal profiles of dyslexia/ SpLD – linear 

pdf

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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

template format

C1 Individual, personal profile of dyslexia/ SpLD – spatial

pdf (C1 & C2)

pdf

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The template has 4 areas that relate to the elements of the Individual, Personal Profile of Dyslexia/ SpLD as developed in Book 1 . The purpose of the template is to gather together all the insights gained about the way you function best and how the pitfalls of your dyslexia/ SpLD can be kept to a minimum.


The template is set out for those who like a spatial approach, who will use the space as part of their processing.


The template is a single landscape A4 page.

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  • The date when you start to use the template is worth noting.  Your profile is likely to change over time; at some stage, you may want to start a new sheet and knowing the dates of the different versions is often interesting.

  • As you learn how the different elements impact on your life, fill in key words or brief descriptions.
  • You can use the space in the way that feels right to you.
  • Template C2 is an example profile to show the kind of insights that can be gained.
  • Although Template C4 is in a linear format, it is worth seeing the insights shown in the two examples.
  • Keep testing your understanding of your profile by trying out the insights in different tasks or situations.
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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

template format

C2 Example Individual, personal profile of dyslexia/ SpLD – spatial 

pdf (C1 & C2)

pdf

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The template is an example of an individual personal profile. Often instructions only make sense when you’ve seen the end result in an example.

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Use the template to make sense of the instructions to Template C1.

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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

template format

C3 Individual, personal profile of dyslexia/ SpLD – linear  

pdf (C3 & C4)

pdf docx

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The template has 4 sections that relate to the elements of the Individual, Personal Profile of Dyslexia/ SpLD as developed in Book 1 . The purpose of the template is to gather together all the insights gained about the way you function best and how the pitfalls of your dyslexia/ SpLD can be kept to a minimum.


The template is set out for those who like a linear approach, who will probably enjoy making lists of their insights.


The template is a single A4 page that can be downloaded as a pdf file or a Word document.

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  • The date when you start to use the template is worth noting.  Your profile is likely to change over time; at some stage, you may want to start a new sheet  and knowing the dates of the different versions is often interesting.

  • As you learn how the different elements impact on your life, write key words or brief descriptions.
  • You can group the insights in linear lists, if this makes sense to you.
  • Template C4 has 2 example profiles to show the kind of insights that can be gained.
  • Although Template C2 is in a spatial format, it is worth seeing the insights shown in the example.
  • Keep testing your understanding of your profile by trying out the insights in different tasks or situations.
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Template  – files for downloading

instructions

template format

C4 Two Examples of Individual, personal profiles of dyslexia/ SpLD – linear 

pdf (C3 & C4)

pdf

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The template has two examples of individual personal profiles. Often instructions only make sense when you’ve seen the end result in an example.

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Use the template to make sense of the instructions to Template C3.

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Overview

As you gain insights into the ways you think and function well, you will build up a picture of how to manage your dyslexia/ SpLD; the accumulated ideas are your Regime for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD.


The first 2 templates in this section allow you to reflect on a situation and observe what is happening for you.  One is a mind map, suitable for those who like to work in a spatial way; the other is set out with areas that can be used for linear lists.

The second 2 templates allow to gather together the insights you accumulate from the reflections.  You can use the resulting regime to discuss with others how you work and what you need by way of adjustments.

The final template is an example from one particular student.  Seeing an example often makes sense of instructions.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

D1 Managing dyslexia/ SpLD – spatial 

pdf

pdf

D2 Managing dyslexia/ SpLD – linear 

pdf

pdf docx

D3 Regime for managing dyslexia/ SpLD – spatial 

pdf

pdf

D4 Regime for managing dyslexia/ SpLD – linear 

pdf

pdf docx

D5 Experiences for managing dyslexia/ SpLD
(example from a student) 

pdf

pdf

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

D1 Managing dyslexia/ SpLD – spatial 

pdf

pdf

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This template is a mind map set out for exploring how you are managing your dyslexia/ SpLD in a particular situation.


There is an example in template D5: Experiences for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD (example from a student).  For her, the ‘strategies for defining goals’ became a list of different, successful ways she approaches her life.


This template is a single, portrait A4 page.  D5 is a single, landscape A4 page.

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  • Print the page or download it into your device.
  • As you fill in the template, use the space to show any relationships between different entries.  You can use colour, symbols or drawings as well.
  • Use D5: Experiences for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD (Example from a Student) to show you the sort of things that can be useful.

  • Date, place, situation: record date and place; briefly describe what is happening.

  • Goal aimed for : summarise what you want to happen in this situation.  How well do you manage to achieve it?

  • Thinking preferences used: summarise the ways you are using your best thinking preferences and strategies in the situation.  How effectively are you using them?  Do you need to try something else?

  • Pitfalls recognised: describe any effects due to your dyslexia/ SpLD.  Can you identify:
    • glitches, which just take a moment to deal with
    • hazards, which take some mental effort and time to deal with
    • obstacles, for which you have to find ways round?

  • Pause strategies: identify and describe any strategies you use to pause and give yourself time to deal more effectively with the situation.  How effective are your pauses?  How well do you manage after a pause?

  • Think about your entries.  Are there any significant points that help you manage your dyslexia/ SpLD better?  Is there anything that you want to transfer to Template D3: Regime for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD ­ Spatial?
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

D2 Managing dyslexia/ SpLD – linear 

pdf

pdf docx

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The template has sections for looking at how you manage a situation that is affected by your dyslexia/ SpLD.  These sections are set out so that you can use them in a linear way.


There is an example in template D5: Experiences for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD (Example from a Student).  For her, the ‘strategies for defining goals’ became a list of different, successful ways she approaches her life.


This template is a single, portrait A4 page.  D5 is a single, landscape A4 page.

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  • Print the page or download it into your device.
  • Use key words, brief phrases or sentences to fill in the sections.  Make lists, if that is the way you like to process information.
  • Use D5: Experiences for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD (Example from a Student) to show you the sort of things that can be useful.

  • Date, place, situation: record date and place; briefly describe what is happening.

  • Goal aimed for: summarise what you want to happen in this situation.  How well do you manage to achieve it?

  • Thinking preferences used: summarise the ways you are using your best thinking preferences and strategies in the situation.  How effectively are you using them?  Do you need to try something else?

  • Pitfalls recognised: describe any effects due to your dyslexia/ SpLD.  Can you identify:
    • glitches, which just take a moment to deal with
    • hazards, which take some mental effort and time to deal with
    • obstacles, for which you have to find ways round?

  • Pause strategies: identify and describe any strategies you use to pause and give yourself time to deal more effectively with the situation.  How effective are your pauses?  How well do you manage after a pause?

  • Think about your entries.  Are there any significant points that help you manage your dyslexia/ SpLD better? Is there anything that you want to transfer to Template D4: Regime for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD ­ Linear?
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

D3 Regime for managing dyslexia/ SpLD – spatial 

pdf

pdf

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The template is a mind map for you to gather together all the insights you gain about the way you manage dyslexia/ SpLD.  It is divided into:

  • thinking preferences to use
  • strategies for defining goals
  • possible pitfalls
  • pause strategies.

This is a document that you can use to discuss how you maximise your potential and minimise the hampering effects of your dyslexia/ SpLD.


There is an example in Template D5: Experiences for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD (Example from a Student).  For her, the ‘strategies for defining goals’ became a list of different, successful ways she approaches her life.


This template is a single, portrait A4 page.  D5 is a single, landscape A4 page.

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  • Print or download the document.
  • As you fill in the sections from your previous collections of insights, group the entries together into related clusters.  Use key words, or phrases.  Try to be brief in what you write, but have enough detail that you can remember what each bit means.
  • Use D5: Experiences for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD (Example from a Student), to show you the sort of things that can be useful.

  • Date: enter the date you start using the template.  Your Regime is likely to change over time; at some stage, you may want to start a new sheet and knowing the dates of the different versions is often interesting.

  • Thinking preferences to use: list what you have discovered about the way you think well.  It is quite a good idea to indicate how important each preference is.

  • Strategies for defining goals:  describe the ways you set about to identify your goals.

  • Possible pitfalls:  these are the aspects of your dyslexia/ SpLD that can get in the way of you functioning at your best.  Having a clear list is one of the first steps to decreasing the impact they have on your life.

  • Pause strategies:  note how you pause.  It is useful to know any conditions that affect how well you can use any technique.

  • Priorities:  as you use your Regime, you may find there is a difference in the importance of the various aspects.  Add these differences to your Regime.
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

D4 Regime for managing dyslexia/ SpLD – linear 

pdf

pdf docx

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The template has sections for you to list together all the insights you gain about the way you manage dyslexia/ SpLD.  It is divided into:

  • thinking preferences to use
  • strategies for defining goals
  • possible pitfalls
  • pause strategies.

This is a document that you can use to discuss how you maximise your potential and minimise the hampering effects of your dyslexia/ SpLD.


There is an example in template D5: Experiences for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD (Example from a Student).  For her, the ‘strategies for defining goals’ became a list of different, successful ways she approaches her life.


This template is a single, portrait A4 page.  D5 is a single, landscape A4 page.

Close

  • Print or download the document.
  • As you fill in the sections from your previous collections of insights, group the entries together into related clusters.  Use key words, or phrases.  Try to be brief in what you write, but have enough detail that you can remember what each bit means.
  • Use D5: Experiences for Managing Dyslexia/ SpLD (Example from a Student) to show you the sort of things that can be useful.

  • Date: enter the date you start using the template.  Your Regime is likely to change over time; at some stage, you may want to start a new sheet  and knowing the dates of the different versions is often interesting.

  • Thinking preferences to use:  list what you have discovered about the way you think well.  It is quite a good idea to indicate how important each preference is.

  • Strategies for defining goals:  describe the ways you set about identifying your goals.

  • Possible pitfalls:  these are the aspects of your dyslexia/ SpLD that can get in the way of you functioning at your best.  Having a clear list is one of the first steps to decreasing the impact they have on your life.

  • Pause strategies:  note how you pause.  It is useful to know any conditions that affect how well you can use any technique.

  • Priorities:  as you use your Regime, you may find there is a difference in the importance of the various aspects.  Add these differences to your Regime.
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

D5 Experiences for managing dyslexia/ SpLD
(example from a student) 

pdf

pdf

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This template is a list of experiences from one student of how she manages her dyslexia. Sometimes instructions make more sense when you can see an example.


Print or download the document if that makes it easier to refer to.

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Use with the other templates of this section.

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Overview

The templates in this section will help you explore thinking preferences, i.e. how you think well when doing any task, learning or dealing with a situation.  There are:

  • a list of possible options
  • a table of importance, with an example
  • templates, spatial or linear, for gathering insights about your thinking preferences
  • a questionnaire to explore visual, verbal or kinaesthetic options
  • the box ‘other’ for those insights that don’t fit anywhere but which need to be recorded.
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Template  – files for downloading   

Instructions

Template format

E1 List of options for thinking preferences

pdf

pdf

E2 Table of your thinking preferences 

pdf

pdf docx

E3 Example: Table of thinking preferences 

pdf

pdf

E4 Thinking preferences – spatial 

pdf

pdf

E5 Thinking preferences – linear 

pdf

pdf docx

E6 Visual, aural, kinaesthetic questionnaire 

pdf

pdf

E7 The box ‘other’ 

pdf

pdf docx

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Template  – files for downloading   

Instructions

Template format

E1 List of options for thinking preferences

pdf

pdf

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The template contains the key words of the many ways different thinking preferences can be used.


It is two A4 pages.

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  • Download the template to your device or print it.
  • If you print it, decide how you want to use it; you might like to see both pages together, in which case double-sided printing won’t be helpful.  But, if you want double-sided printing, select flipping or binding on the long edge.

  • As you explore different options, you can highlight or underline those that you use. 
  • You can code them according to how easy you find them to use.

  • Sometimes, your thinking preferences may not work for a new situation or task.  If that happens, use the list in this template to experiment with other thinking processes to see if there is one which will help you better with the new situation or task.

  • It is also a good idea to explore options that don’t immediately appeal; you may find new ones that really work for you.
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Template  – files for downloading   

Instructions

Template format

E2 Table of your thinking preferences 

pdf

pdf docx

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The final aim of exploring thinking preferences is know what thinking processes you use for which tasks and to know how easy and reliable each option is.  This template allows you to record your experience.


The more unfamiliar or complex any topic is, the more the order of your thinking preferences will be important.


This template is a single A4 page.


The Template E3 is an Example: Table of Thinking Preferences of one person’s experience.

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  • Download or print the template.
  • Anytime when you have reached an understanding of the importance to you of the various thinking options, you can use this table to record your understanding.

  • Enter the date when you start using the template.  You may find your preferences develop over time and use.

  • Thinking processes: list which one you use in the order of importance – this list shows your thinking preferences.
  • Used for: use these columns to how how you use each thinking process.

  • References to evidence: this table could be useful when letting others know how you deal with your dyslexia/ SpLD.  Its use is strengthened when you can back your decisions with evidence from notes about your use of the thinking preferences.  The ‘References to evidence’ column allows you to record where you keep the evidence.  It is useful to be able to find it easily when you want it.
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Template  – files for downloading   

Instructions

Template format

E3 Example: Table of thinking preferences 

pdf

pdf

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This template is a completed example of the table in E2. Instructions are often easier to understand when you can see what the final product looks like.


It is a single A4 page.

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  • Download or print the template.
  • Use the example with the other templates in this section. 
  • Does this layout help you?
  • Is there another layout that would suit you better?
  • How are you deciding the strengths of your thinking preferences?
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Template  – files for downloading   

Instructions

Template format

E4 Thinking Preferences – spatial 

pdf

pdf

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This template is a spatial arrangement for you to capture insights as you explore thinking preferences.  It can be used with the templates in Section B, especially B2 Know Your Own Mind.


The template is a single A4 page.

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  • Print the template or download it to your device.
  • Put in the date you start using the template.

  • Fill in the sections as you find which of the ways work for you, include brief notes about how you use any of the options.

  • How well you deal with dyslexic/ SpLD situations can be noted in ‘Levels of Compensation’.
  • How well you deal with situations which have an emotional impact can be noted in ‘Emotional competence’
  • ‘Other’ can be used for insights you don’t want to lose but which don’t seem to fit anywhere else.

  • Put the date against each entry so that you have a sense of how your knowledge grows.
  • Make more detailed notes somewhere as evidence of how you use the various thinking preferences.  On the template, record where you keep the evidence-notes.

  • When you have a feeling for the relative importance of your thinking preferences, fill them in on Template E2: Table of Thinking Preferences.
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Template  – files for downloading   

Instructions

Template format

E5 Thinking Preferences – linear 

pdf

pdf docx

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This template is set out for you to capture insights in a linear format as you explore thinking preferences. It can be used with the templates in Section B, especially B2 Know Your Own Mind.


The template is a single A4 page.

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  • Print the template or download it to your device.
  • Put in the date you start using the template.

  • Fill in the sections as you find which of the ways work for you, include brief notes about how you use any of the options.

  • How well you deal with dyslexic/ SpLD situations can be noted in ‘Levels of Compensation’.
  • How well you deal with situations which have an emotional impact can be noted in ‘Emotional competence’
  • ‘Other’ can be used for insights you don’t want to lose but which don’t seem to fit anywhere else.

  • Put the date against each entry so that you have a sense of how your knowledge grows.
  • Make more detailed notes somewhere as evidence of how you use the various thinking preferences.  On the template, record where you keep the evidence-notes.

  • When you have a feeling for the relative importance of your thinking preferences, fill them in on Template E2: Table of Thinking Preferences.
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Template  – files for downloading   

Instructions

Template format

E6 Visual, Aural, Kinaesthetic Questionnaire 

pdf

pdf

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The template is a set of questions to enable you to think about the way you use your senses to do various tasks. 

It is intended as a starting point to think about your use of the different senses.  Further observation of real situations can then be used to be sure of the result from the questionnaire.


The questions are on one A4 page, with a table for results on the 2nd page. Close

  • Download the template onto your device or print it.

  • Circle the letter on the margin for any statement that is true for you.
  • Count the number of As, Vs and Ks you have circled.
  • Enter the numbers into the table on page 2 and see what percentage of answers you chose ‘yes’ for each of Visual, Aural or Kinaesthetic.
  • The relative numbers indicate the relative use you make of these three different senses.

  • Think about the results using the questions below the table.
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Template  – files for downloading   

Instructions

Template format

E7 The box ‘other’ 

pdf

pdf docx

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There may be insights that don’t fit into any of the specified categories but which you know are important.  the box ‘other’ is a way of capturing these insights.


It is a table set out on a landscape A4 page.

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  • Print or download the template onto your device.

  • Date: enter the date you use the template.

  • Situation: describe what is happening.

  • Using the template for several situations: you might want to use the template for several situations.  Number each one and then use the number to show which of the other entries belong to a particular situation.

  • Evidence of intelligence: you should put down all the ways you are showing capability and intelligence.

  • Practical abilities: include the practical skills you have.  These can be overlooked but they are very important.

  • Characteristics that don’t fit anywhere else: describe the insights that don’t seem to fit anywhere else and why they are important.

  • Interests, in order of importance: your interests can be an important part of how you engage with activities and they may contribute further ideas that will help you achieve your goals and fulfil your potential.

  • Possibilities: include anything that would be worth exploring further.

  • Further confirmation: build on the ideas you put down in the box ‘other’.  This is important information about the way you think best and what helps you as an individual.
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Overview

The templates in this section will help you:

  • develop your organisation skills
  • solve problems
  • find the root of any problem
  • work with time and space.


The first three groups each have alternative formats depending on the way you prefer to work: with a mind map; using space to collect ideas; using a linear list.



Any insights you gain into the way you function best can be added to your profile of dyslexia/ SpLD and your regime for managing dyslexia/ SpLD.  Templates relating to building your own Individual, Personal Profile of Dyslexia/ SpLD and Regime for managing the Dyslexia/ SpLD are in Templates Sections C and D respectively.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

F1 Developing organisation – mind map 

pdf (F1-F3)

pdf

F2 Developing organisation – spatial 

pdf docx

F3 Developing organisation – linear

pdf docx

F4 Problem solving – mind map 

pdf (F4-F6)

pdf

F5 Problem solving – spatial 

pdf docx

F6 Problem solving – linear 

pdf docx

F7 Root cause of a problem – mind map 

pdf (F7-F9)

pdf

F8 Root cause of a problem – spatial 

pdf docx

F9 Root cause of a problem – linear 

pdf docx

F10 Understanding time or place problems 

pdf

pdf docx

F11 Exploring time 

pdf

pdf docx

F12 Week with hours 

pdf

pdf

F13 Calendar month – 5 weeks 

pdf

pdf

F14 Half year – 27 weeks 2021 July-Dec 

pdf (F14-F18)

pdf

F15 Half year – 27 weeks 2022 

pdf

F16 Half year – 27 weeks no dates 

pdf

F17 Half year – 27 weeks Excel spreadsheet 

xlsx

F18 Half year – 27 weeks Open Source spread sheet 

xlsx

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

F1 Developing organisation – mind map 

pdf (F1-F3)

pdf

F2  Developing organisation – spatial 

pdf docx

F3 Developing organisation – linear 

pdf docx

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This set of templates allows you to work out what you need to do to organise something:

a task, an event, a project, a set of objects, paperwork, emails, etc.


It is a very general way of working, but effective.  You might want to work systematically through the different steps,  1 – 5, or you might move irregularly through the steps as ideas occur to you. 


For the mind map, F1, you can build branches away from each symbol and you can show relationships by the way the branches divide.


For the spatial template, F2, use the areas to group ideas but otherwise use the space as feels right.


For the linear template, F3, make lists under each heading.


The mind map and spatial templates are landscape, A4 pages, and the linear one is a portrait, A4 page.  There are pdf versions for each template; F2 and F3 are also available as Word documents that can be used on a computer.  If you have mind-mapping software, set up a mind map similar to F1.

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Hard copy:  Print the template that you want to use; if you like working with colour, work with coloured pens and highlighters.

Working electronically:  Copy the template to an appropriate place on your computer/ electronic device; name it in a way that helps you find it later.


Title or key words: give what needs organising a title, or represent it in a few key words.  For the purpose of these instructions, your project represents what is being organised.


Gather your strengths: write down all the things that you know you do well; include everything; unexpected things might turn out to be very helpful with your project.


Assess hazards: write down anything that you know is going to make organising your project difficult.  I would suggest that you separate the hazards into those that relate to your dyslexia/ SpLD and those that don’t.


Describe your project: you can outline the project because that will probably help you think about the organisation; don’t go into unnecessary detail; you need to focus on the organisation aspects of your project; if your project is big, divide it into smaller, more manageable sub-projects.


Recognise insuperable obstacles: as you describe your project, you may realise there are certain things that you have no way to work round; you need to put them down and decide what to do about them; you may need to ask others to help you.


Develop constructive ways forward: gather ideas that you would like to use and build them into a system; you may be able to think of several ways to organise your project, but if you don’t like what you choose to do, you will be making life hard for yourself and you probably won’t be able to organise your project.


Record your organisation: record how you have decided to organise your project and note where you have recorded it; keep monitoring how your organisation is working for you and let it evolve to be something that you can work with effectively.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

F4 Problem solving – mind map 

pdf (F4-F6)

pdf

F5 Problem solving – spatial 

pdf docx

F6 Problem solving – linear 

pdf docx

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This set of templates allows you to work on a problem by reflecting on various issues.  You might want to work systematically through the different sections, or you might move irregularly as ideas occur to you. 


For the mind map, F4, you can build sub-branches away from each main branch and you can show relationships by the way the sub-branches divide.  The labels on the arms are key words for different issues.


For the spatial template, F5, use the areas to group ideas but otherwise use the space as feels right.  The same key words are used to label the spaces as are used on the mind map.


For the linear template, F6, make lists under each heading.  The headings are questions using the key words on the mind map.


The mind map and spatial templates are landscape, A4 pages, and the linear one is a portrait, A4 page.  They are all single pages.  There are pdf versions for each template; F5 and F6 are also available as Word documents that can be used on a computer.  If you have mind-mapping software, set up a mind map similar to F4.

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Hard copy:  Print the template that you want to use; if you like working with colour, work with coloured pens and highlighters.

Working electronically:  Copy the template to an appropriate place on your computer/ electronic device; name it in a way that helps you find it later.


Problem: use a few words to capture the problem, or give it a title.  Replace the words the problem with your title, or words, if this helps you focus your mind.


Facts: write down the facts about the problem.  Be as literal as you can be, try to be objective and leave feelings out.


Present state: describe the state of the problem’, i.e. what has happened so far with the problem.  Here you can include feelings.


Best possible outcome:  set out how you would like matters to be when the problem is resolved.


Other people:  include people who are involved with the problem, and those who might be able to help with advice or practically.


Anything missing:  as you gather your thoughts about the problem, you may realise that certain things, or people, are missing from the present state of affairs.  Write them down.


Hazards or obstacles:  write down anything that is impeding progress in solving the problem.


Resolution:  how can you move the problem from the present state to the best possible outcome?  Do you still want the same outcome that you put down earlier?


Action plan:  make an action plan to move the problem forward.  This might just be for immediate progress; it might be to achieve the best possible outcome.


Include revisiting your reflections on the problem
Did it help you resolve the problem?
Were all the right issues included? 
What would you do differently another time?

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

F7 Root cause of a problem – mind map 

pdf (F7-F9)

pdf

F8 Root cause of a problem – spatial 

pdf docx

F9 Root cause of a problem – linear 

pdf docx

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As you work on organisation you may come across problems.  As you engage with problem‑solving, you may realise that something unknown is the root cause of a problem you are trying to solve.  In the instructions below, ‘the problem’ written in italics represents the one whose root cause you are trying to find.


This set of templates enables you to explore the root cause of the problem.  The same set of questions is on each template.


You might want to work systematically through the different questions or you might move irregularly through them as ideas occur to you. 


For the mind map, F7, you can build sub-branches away from each branch and you can show relationships by the way the sub-branches divide.


For the spatial template, F8, use the areas to group ideas but otherwise use the space as feels right.


For the linear template, F9, make lists under each heading.


The mind map and spatial templates are landscape, A4 pages, and the linear one is a portrait, A4 page.  They are all single pages.  There are pdf versions for each template; F8 and F9 are also available as Word documents that can be used on a computer.  If you have mind-mapping software, set up a mind map similar to F7.

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Hard copy:  Print the template that you want to use; if you like working with colour, work with coloured pens and highlighters.

Working electronically:  Copy the template to an appropriate place on your computer/ electronic device; name it in a way that helps you find it later.


Root cause of the problem: fill in the problem you are working on that is showing you something unknown is getting in the way.


What is happening?  Include anything that is impeding your progress with the problem you’re solving.


How are you trying to do something?  Write down what you are trying to do.


What is going wrong?  Describe how solving the main problem is being hampered.


What are the pressures? Think about any feelings you have or any pressure that is impacting on the problem you are trying to solve and the way you are doing it.


Does anything emerge as the root cause?  In answering these questions you are searching for anything that is undermining your progress in solving the main problem.  It could be some information you don’t have, some objects or equipment that is missing. You may need help from other people. It could be a worry or anxiety or other emotional reaction that is preventing progress.  It could be something completely unrelated to the main problem you are working on, but which you subconsciously know needs attention.  Whatever it is, it will be easier to deal with once it is clearly identified and the appropriate help can be found.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

F10 Understanding time or place problems 

pdf

pdf docx

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This template is a useful way to understand how you deal with time or place:
how either cause you problems
what strategies you use to deal with them. 

You can identify the circumstances that influence the way you deal with time or place. 

You can notice when any problem is a glitch, hazard or obstacle.


The template format is tabular for easy comparison; it contains 2 identical A4 landscape pages.

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  • Select the appropriate settings on your printer, either single-sided, or double-sided printing, in which case select flipping or binding on the long edge.
  • Draw a line at the end of each entry so that they are clearly kept separate.

  • If you want to work electronically, create a table with 5 columns, in landscape orientation.  Use the bold headings below and have one entry per row.

  • Date: enter the date.

  • Time or place details: note the time, and the place; both are worth recording. 

  • What is happening: describe the events taking place.  You can include the result of the problem with time or place.

  • What is going wrong with time or place:  here you describe, objectively, how the problem with time or place impacts on the event.

  • Underlying time or place issues:  How do you think you process time or place? 

  • What are your thinking patterns? 
    How do you feel about any problems? 
    What strategies do you use?
    Are they successful?


  • This template is useful for monitoring your progress as you develop new understanding and strategies for dealing with time and place.
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

F11 Exploring time 

pdf

pdf docx

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The template allows you to build up accurate knowledge of how long tasks take or how long you spend on a particular activity.


The template has 2 identical, portrait pages. It can be down loaded as a pdf or a Word document.

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  • To work on a hard copy, select the appropriate settings on your printer if you want a single page; for double-sided printing, select flipping or binding on the long edge if you want to keep the pages in an A4 ring binder.
  • Draw a line between individual activities to keep them separate.

  • To work on a computer, download the file and save to an appropriate location with a name that will help you find it later.

  • Activity: describe what you are doing.

  • Expected time: record how long you expect the task to take or how long you want to spend on an activity.

  • Start: record the time you start.

  • End: record the end time.

  • Actual time: work out the actual time.

  • Reflect:
  • How does the actual time compare with the expected time?
    When does the difference matter?
    Does the difference impact on others?
    Do you need to use the information to let your life flow better?

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

F12 Week with hours 

pdf

pdf

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This template is 2 landscape pages with equal columns for each day. The first page has headings for the days from Monday to Sunday; the second has no days entered.

The hours between 8 am and 9 pm are marked.

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Print more than one page if necessary.  If you want to consider 7 days in consecutive  weeks, choose the page without days in the headings and write in the days.


If you are working out a timetable for a period of time, you don’t need to put any date by the days, though you might want to put the date that you work on the timetable at the top of the page.


If you are using the sheet to plan a particular week fill in the dates above the days.


As you write in entries, make sure you indicate the start and end time.


When using a sheet like this for time management, it is useful to include journey and preparation times.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

F13 Calendar month – 5 weeks 

pdf

pdf

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You can use this template:

  • just to keep an eye on how activities are spread through a month
  • to help you manage your time
  • to assess priorities during any month.

The template has 11 landscape A4 pages; 8 with 5 weeks for the calendar month and 3 with 6 weeks.


The start day of the week is Monday so that the weekend days stay together.


The days of the month, 1-31, are filled in, with all the different days being set as 1st.


The title on each page gives the start day of the month and the number of weeks.
Pages 1 - 5 are Monday - Friday.


When the month starts on Saturday and Sunday, a 31-day month does not fit into 5 rows.  There are 2 options:

6-week option with the extra days at the bottom and the rows slightly narrower, pages 6 and 7, Saturday and Sunday respectively

5-week option with the extra dates put in brackets in the top row, pages 8 and 9, Saturday and Sunday respectively.


There are no dates on the last 2 pages:
page 10 has 6 weeks
page 11 has 5 weeks.

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  • Print the page(s) that you want to use.

  • Month and year: fill these in. 

  • Tasks: write down any tasks that are important as far as time management or prioritising are concerned.

To keep an eye on the spread of activities

  • Fill in the activities you want to keep an eye on; also include anything that will clash with these activities.


To manage time or assess priorities:

  • Filling in the days: put down everything that is happening, including time away, time to visit friends, time to go shopping: anything that occupies some time.
  • Make the entries brief so that they will fit in.
  • You can write entries with time slots attached or position them approximately according to the time of day when they will happen.
  • Be very realistic, or slightly pessimistic, about the length of time anything will take.

  • Assessing time and priorities: when you have finished filling everything in, see how much time you have available for what you want to do, or must do.
  • You can take a photocopy if you need to move entries around, then you don’t lose the first set.  I often work in pencil so that I can rub out to make changes.
  • Seeing how little time is really available is often helpful when the deadline for a task seems a long way ahead.
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

F14 Half year – 27 weeks 2021 July-Dec 

pdf (F14-F18)

pdf

F15 Half year – 27 weeks 2022  

pdf

F16 Half year – 27 weeks no dates 

pdf

F17 Half year – 27 weeks Excel spreadsheet 

xlsx

F18 Half year – 27 weeks Open Source spread sheet 

xlsx

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This template allows you to look at what is happening in your life over several months.  You may need to assess the different stages of a project; to meet one or more deadlines; to plan a holiday; etc.


The first 2 pdfs, F14 and F15, have 2 portrait, A4 pages with the dates for 2021 and 2022.  There are dates in brackets at the beginning and end of each half year; they belong to the months before and after that half year.

The blank pdf, F16, allows you to put your own dates on.


The spreadsheets, F17 and F18, allow you to select the best range of weeks to suit your present purpose.  There are suggestions as to how the dates can be edited for a different year.

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For 2021 and 2022, print the part of the year that covers the time you need to look at.


If you are using the blank sheet, print it and add the dates as necessary.


Using either of the spreadsheets allows you to select the number of weeks that you need.  Use print preview to adjust the row height so that you have spread the weeks evenly over the page. Choose whether landscape or portrait orientation will be best.  Then print the page.


If you are managing a deadline, put in everything that will occupy time.  Be very realistic.  For example, if you are putting in the time of a journey, allow for delays; don’t rely on being able to read or work on the journey.  It is usually to better to be pessimistic and have time left over than to be too optimistic and run out of time.


It might help to separate the months visually. I do this by drawing a line with a highlighter between the months.

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Overview

The templates in this section relate to reading and language work:

  • understanding the building blocks of language assists comprehension while reading
  • eyes moving in saccades and not gliding over text helps word recognition
  • recognising meaningful groups of words and processing them together leads to better understanding.

‘They’ (etc.) is used for ‘she/he’ (etc.) in the absence of gender-neutral, 3rd person, singular pronouns.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

G1 The functions of ‘round’ and other words 

pdf

pdf docx

G2 The functions of words 

pdf

pdf

G3 Constant content to demonstrate language functions 

pdf

pdf docx

G4 Basic pattern of sentences 

pdf

pdf docx

G5 Basic sentences from a complex one 

pdf

pdf docx

†G6 Eye exercises 1 and 2, increasing eye span 

pdf

pdf

†G7 Eye exercise 3, recognising meaningful groups of words 

pdf

pdf

G8 The story ‘Paper’ split to show word groups 

pdf

pdf

G9 The short story ‘Paper’ 

pdf

pdf

† G6 and G7 were G10 and G11 respectively in Book 4

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

G1 The functions of ‘round’ and other words 

pdf

pdf docx

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This template is a worksheet for exploring the functions of words and how the function of a single word changes in different contexts.  It has an example of ‘round’ as noun, adjective, adverb, verb or preposition and tables to be used as exercises.


Reading can be much easier when a student understands the way words are used in sentences and how they can change their function and meaning depending on context.  Writing is similarly helped by this understanding.


The template is two pages of A4 in portrait orientation.  They can be used separately or together. The second page could be printed twice as a double-sided worksheet.

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  • The first table is an example for discussing the way words are used in different contexts, how their functions and meanings change.
  • The second table provides an opportunity to check understanding by using the same original sentences.
  • The third table allows students to think of other sentences which include the word ‘round’ and then find substitutes.

  • The table on the second page is for further work on other words. The words could either be supplied by the teacher, or the first part of the task could be for students to find words that can be used with different functions.

  • Other words that have different functions include:
  • head (noun, verb, adjective)
    back (noun, verb, adjective, adverb)
    green (noun, verb, adjective)
    shop (noun, verb, adjective)
    like (enjoy: verb; similar: adjective, conjunction, preposition)
    following (noun, adjective, preposition)
    up (adjective, adverb, preposition)
    well (noun, adjective, verb, adverb)
    near (adjective, adverb, preposition)
    before (adverb, conjunction, preposition)

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

G2 The functions of words 

pdf

pdf

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This template is a sheet for working with some vocabulary of language. 

The vocabulary listed here is the function of words and the names of groups of words. 

The template could be useful while using language to express ideas in other subjects.


Parts of speech are used as convenient labels.  Putting words into parts of speech is not helpful for dyslexic/ SpLD people because words can be moved between the categories, as shown in Template G1: The Functions of ‘Round’ and Other Words.


The template is an A4 page.

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Let your student use this template when working on any aspect of language.


Initial work:

Select some text that is interesting to the student and in which the font is not too small nor the layout too cramped.


Choose a different colour for each function.

Underline the words or phrases that fulfil the different functions in the appropriate colours.

Use the parts of speech terminology as long as your student keeps paying attention to the function.

It can be useful to use the same text for each function, possibly having different copies of it.

Do several demonstrations with discussion.  It is important to prevent misunderstandings becoming established.


Start with the naming function.  Move on to the replacing function; and then describing.


Discuss what is being named
what is being replaced
what is being described.


Depending on the student’s questions and interests, choose to identify
relationships
verbs making the group of words into a statement, question or command.


Discuss the relationship and what it is between.

When identifying verbs, find the subject as well.


The skill from this approach is recognising how words work together so that the building blocks of language can be used to assist reading.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

G3 Constant content to demonstrate language functions

pdf

pdf docx

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This template shows different ways to keep content constant while your student is understanding a particular topic that you are teaching and that they are learning.


Remember that subliminal learning and rote learning are unlikely to help a dyslexic/ SpLD student.  You may think you are bored with keeping the content the same, but changing just for the sake of secondary interest may not help your student.  Your student may need to know how the work will help them in the long run, so keep reminding them that reading becomes easier when they recognise what is happening in language.


The template is two pages of A4 in portrait orientation. 

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Consider the examples on page 1 and ask:

  • What do I want my student to learn?
  • Do my examples demonstrate the point clearly without any unnecessary changes?
  • Does my student have any suggestions that could help them learn this topic more easily?

Print both pages separately, i.e. don’t use double-sided printing.  Let your student use the first as a reminder.  Or create your own example sheet based on text you have been using with your student.


Possible text to use:

  • the same text that was used for identifying the Functions of Words in G2
  • text on a topic that is interesting to your student
  • some suitable phrases or sentences that you know can be altered easily.

Initially, work with your student to make the alterations.


Write the task at the top of the sheet, such as:

  • Replace nouns with other nouns, keep pronouns agreeing with the noun as appropriate.
  • Add adjectives or adverbs and discuss how the meaning changes.
  • Change the verb so that the time of the sentence changes.

  • Generally, experiment with words to see what effects can be achieved.
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

G4 Basic pattern of sentences 

pdf

pdf docx

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The first page contains the basic pattern of sentences with explanations of the different components. 
The second page has examples of basic sentences from the story in Template G7: Eye Exercise 3, Recognising Meaningful Groups of Words.


The third page has a table for your student to fill in.


The template is three landscape A4 pages.

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Print all pages on separate sheets.  Page 3 could be used electronically.


Use pages 1 and 2 to discuss sentence structure and answer questions.

Keep at least one of pages 1 and 2 in sight until your student is confident about recognising sentences.  Be guided by your student’s preference as to which page is in sight.  They may need both.


Use some text about a topic your student is interested in.

Demonstrate how to put the text into the basic sentence table.  Discuss how you are doing it and ask your student for suggestions.


Watch while your student does the same task, still on a topic that interests them.


Get your student to practise for 5 minutes a day until they are easily recognising sentences whenever they read.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

G5 Basic sentences from a complex one 

pdf

pdf docx

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The first page of this template contains an example of a complex sentence, combined from 3 simple sentences, put into a table that shows how the simple sentences fit together in the more complex one.  The second page is a worksheet which can be used for similar analysis of complex sentences.


The template is two A4 pages in landscape orientation. If you print double-sided and keep pages in a ring binder, set the printing to bind or flip on the long side.  It may be helpful to print page 1 separately and print page 2 twice, double-sided; then page 1 can be seen while page 2 is being used.

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  • Reading is helped when the underlying structure of the building blocks of language is understood.  The structure usually needs to be taught deliberately to dyslexia/ SpLD students.

  • In turning a complex sentence into its basic sentences, it is important to be clear about any changes that have been made. It may not be helpful to give full explanations, but the changes should be visible.  In the example, there is a time element in the complex sentence which is retained in the way the sentences are numbered. 

  • Use complex sentences which relate to the everyday life of students. 
  • Use different tenses.
  • Use verbs that are not obviously ‘doing’ words, such as: sleep, think, become, have.
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

G6 Eye exercises 1 and 2, increasing eye span 

pdf

pdf

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This template provides two eye exercises adapted from Harrap’s Swift Readers, Book 5.  The purpose of the exercises is to check eye movement while reading and to train the eyes to move in jumps, known as saccades.


The template is two A4 sheets.

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Exercise 1

  • Explain to your student that eyes take in words better when they move across a page in jumps rather than in a smooth manner. 
  • Use a piece of paper to cover all but the top line of exercise 1 and ask your student to read the letters without moving their eyes and then let them follow the instructions at the top of the exercise.
  • Discuss with them:
    •  how they feel their eyes are moving
    • what you notice
    • how they feel as they try to keep their eyes on the cross.
  • They can practise the exercise over several days.

Exercise 2

  • The exercise is similar to exercise 1, but is based on words instead of letters.  When eyes are accustomed to sliding across print, it can be quite difficult to keep them on the line, but the improvement in reading skill is worth the effort.

Reference

Elder, T. and Wood R. (Eds.) 1961, Harrap’s Swift Readers, Book 5, Harrap, London

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

G7 Eye exercise 3, recognising meaningful groups of words

pdf

pdf

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The template is a story that has been broken into short meaning-related groups of words.


It is a single A4 page.

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Discuss the way the groups of words are selected so that they form meaningful groups.  Use other texts that your student is reading and ask them to mark the meaningful groups.


Keep the groups short to begin with.  Your student can lengthen the groups when their reading mind becomes more familiar with the skill.


Reference

The exercise is adapted from one in

Elder, T. and Wood R. (Eds.) 1961, Harrap’s Swift Readers, Book 5, Harrap, London

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

G8 The story ‘Paper’ split to show word groups 

pdf

pdf

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The template is a story that has been broken into meaning-related groups of words.

The groups are longer than in G7: Eye Exercise 3, Recognising Meaningful Groups of Words, and the gaps shorter


It is a single A4 page.

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Discuss the way the groups of words are selected so that they form meaningful groups. 


Compare the layout with the normal layout of the story in Template G9: The Short Story ‘Paper’.


Use other texts that your student is reading and ask them to mark the meaningful groups.


Keep the groups short to begin with.  Your student can lengthen the groups when their reading mind becomes more familiar with the skill.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

G9 The short story ‘Paper’ 

pdf

pdf

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The short story from Template G8:The Story ‘Paper’ Split To Show Word Groups is written normally, i.e. without any extra spaces to emphasise the meaningful groups of words.


It is a single A4 page.

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Discuss what to look for to recognise meaningful groups of words.


Work with similar passages from other sources.

What difference does it make if you use text relating to one of your student’s hobbies or interests?

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Overview

Check-lists can be used in many different ways, including:

  • to keep on track with major projects
  • as a reminder of tasks or ideas that might be relevant in a particular situation
  • to give an overview of a complex topic or project
  • to reflect on our own progress.

The check-lists in this section reflect different reasons for using the information in these books.  They are sets of questions and themes that relate to the different reasons.

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Before you read the books in this series, the check-lists can be used to help your mind prepare for the information and knowledge you will be reading about.


Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

H1 Check-list for researchers and assessors 

pdf

pdf docx

H2 Check-list about the general background

pdf

pdf docx

H3 Audits of Understanding and Skills – for an Individual Dyslexic/ SpLD Person 

pdf

pdf docx

H4 Check-list for direct support 

pdf

pdf docx

H5 Check-list for general teaching 

pdf

pdf docx

H6 Check-list for professional people who exercise responsibility or authority 

pdf

pdf docx

H7 Check-list for policy-makers, campaigners and media personnel 

pdf

pdf docx

H8 Check-list for indirect communicators 

pdf

pdf docx

Useful templates from Section B

B4Action, Results, Next Step

B5-B8Recording Templates

B11Monitoring Progress


B4 has 5 columns: date, event, action, result, next step
The template is useful for capturing what happens as you try out ideas in the books.

B5-B8: The templates don’t have specific headings.  They have four or five columns, which are either equally wide or have different widths.  You can choose how you want to use them.  One technique is to use the narrow column on the right to record a theme so that you can easily pull together the entries for single themes.

B11 has 5 columns:

  1. date
  2. skill/ task
  3. what you do/ what is working
  4. how easy/ how difficult is it?
  5. what next?

Monitoring the progress of how you are using any of the ideas in the books is worth doing in a systematic way.  Writing down what happens can be more powerful than trying to remember: you may be surprised at the benefits; you may become aware of gaps.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

H1 Check-list for researchers and assessors 

pdf

pdf docx

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The checklist is a set of questions that stem from the major ideas in the series of books and especially Development of Dyslexia and other SpLDs.  They are prompts to consider the importance of dyslexia/ SpLD in your professional work and the quality of conversations you have with dyslexic/ SpLD people. 
The questions cover:

  • your profession and your approach
  • understanding dyslexia/ SpLD
  • discussion with dyslexic/ SpLD people
  • tests and experiments
  • research processes.

The template is two A4 portrait pages and can be downloaded as a pdf or Word document.


Useful templates from Section B

B4 – Action, Results, Next Step

B5-B8 – Recording Templates

B11 – Monitoring Progress

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Print or download the format you want to use. 

If you save the template for use electronically, do so with a name and in a place that means you can find it again.


Before you read the book(s) in this series, the check-list can be used to help your mind prepare for the information and knowledge you will be reading about.


As you read the book(s):

  • the check-list can be used to help you cover the material you want to read
  • the questions in the Word document can be used as headers for creating a set of notes.

After reading any of the books, the checklist can be used to:

  • reflect on the ideas that are taken for granted in your profession
  • consider how the effects of dyslexia/ SpLD impact on those you work with
  • assess what you need to know about dyslexia/ SpLD
  • discuss situations with dyslexic/ SpLD people
  • put in place policies, systems and accommodations that will diminish the impact of the dyslexia/ SpLD of the people with whom you work or communicate
  • consider any other changes in your work practice that would be beneficial.
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

H2 Check-list about the general background 

pdf

pdf docx

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The check-list is a set of questions about:
understanding dyslexia/ SpLD issues
dyslexic-/ SpLD-friendly approaches
imparting information to dyslexic/ SpLD people.

The issues covered give a good background understanding of dyslexia/ SpLD.


The template is an A4 portrait page and can be downloaded as a pdf or Word document.


Useful templates from Section B

B4 – Action, Results, Next Step

B5-B8 – Recording Templates

B11 – Monitoring Progress

Close

Print or download the format you want to use. 

If you save the template for use electronically, do so with a name and in a place that means you can find it again.


Before you read the book(s) in this series, the check-list can be used to help your mind prepare for the information and knowledge you will be reading about.


As you read the book(s):

  • the check-list can be used to help you cover the material you want to read
  • the questions in the Word document can be used as headers for creating a set of notes.

After reading any of the books, use the check-list to assess:

  • how far you understand the issues
  • to what extent you already adopt dyslexic/ SpLD friendly approaches
  • the context in which you are likely to encounter dyslexic/ SpLD people
  • the role(s) in which you encounter dyslexic/ SpLD people
  • how open you are to people who do tasks differently or think differently to the way you do.

You can also reflect on any further questions you have and where you are likely to find out more.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

H3 Audits of Understanding and Skills – for an Individual Dyslexic/ SpLD Person 

pdf

pdf docx

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The check-list is about giving autonomy, or agency, to a person with dyslexia/ SpLD. 


It can be used by someone giving direct support to a dyslexic/ SpLD person, to check how well the skills and understanding have been covered in discussions and how well the dyslexia/ SpLD is being managed. 


It can also be used by someone who is dyslexic/ SpLD, especially to see what else will help with managing dyslexia/ SpLD.


The check-list is in two parts:

  1. about an individual’s dyslexia/ SpLD
    • a personal profile
    • managing the effects
    • individual experience
  2. using the mind effectively
    • how the mind works
    • techniques
    • thinking skills
    • unhelpful learning processes.

The questions are addressed to a person with dyslexia/ SpLD


Each part is on a separate A4 page.  The checklist can be downloaded as a pdf or Word document.


Useful templates from Section B

B4 – Action, Results, Next Step

B5-B8 – Recording Templates

B11 – Monitoring Progress

Close

Print or download the format you want to use. 

If you save the template for use electronically, do so with a name and in a place that means you can find it again.


Before you read the book(s) in this series, the check-list can be used to help your mind prepare for the information and knowledge you will be reading about.


As you read the book(s):

  • the check-list can be used to help you cover the material you want to read
  • the questions in the Word document can be used as headers for creating a set of notes.

The check-list can be used by a support provider with an individual person:

  • How confident is my student about the things they do well?
  • How well does my student understand their dyslexia/ SpLD?
  • Are they using objective observation?
  • Which techniques have we covered?
  • Are the techniques being used?
  • What else is emerging about the way my student processes information?

  • Have we covered ideas that aren’t immediately useful so that my student will have options in future situations?
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

H4 Check-list for direct support 

pdf

pdf docx

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To work with someone who has dyslexia/ SpLD, a support person needs to be able:

  • to observe objectively and explore issues with minimum interference from their own expectations
  • to listen to the dyslexic/ SpLD person with a broad understanding of issues
  • to look for solutions and ways round problems encountered
  • to resist seeing dyslexia/ SpLD as excuses for unfulfilled potential.

This check-list covers:

  • observation
  • supporting an individual dyslexic/ SpLD person or student
  • thinking preferences
  • communication.

It also recommends using check-list H3: An Audit of Knowledge and Skills – for an Individual Dyslexic/ SpLD Person.


The template is an A4 portrait page and can be downloaded as a pdf or Word document.


Useful templates from Section B

B4 – Action, Results, Next Step

B5-B8 – Recording Templates

B11 – Monitoring Progress

Close

Print or download the format you want to use. 

If you save the template for use electronically, do so with a name and in a place that means you can find it again.


Before you read the book(s) in this series, the check-list can be used to help your mind prepare for the information and knowledge you will be reading about.


As you read the book(s):

  • the check-list can be used to help you cover the material you want to read
  • the questions in the Word document can be used as headers for creating a set of notes.

After reading the book(s), the check-list can be used to reflect on:

  • the way you use observation
  • how open you are to approaches that are different to yours
  • whether you deliberately discuss with your students how they build 1) their profile of dyslexia/ SpLD and 2) their regime for managing it
  • how you notice any possible misunderstandings  and how you deal with them
  • how positive you are about finding solutions to problems and giving your student agency when they are away from you.

What further questions do you have?

Who will help you find the answers?


Also use check-list H2 Check-list about the General Background to reflect on you general understanding of dyslexia/ SpLD.

Use H3 Audits of Understanding and Skills – for an Individual Dyslexic/ SpLD Person to guide and reflect on your work with each dyslexic/ SpLD student you work with.

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

H5 Check-list for general teaching 

pdf

pdf docx

Close

Most of the teaching approaches that are vital for dyslexic/ SpLD students are also good practice for other students.  They can be incorporated into general teaching to the benefit of all.  They depend on an openness to different ways of thinking and an appreciation of the needs of others. 


The check-list covers:

  • your own style (of learning and teaching) and preferences
  • delivery
  • students’ learning
  • communication
  • materials.

The template is an A4 portrait page and can be downloaded as a pdf or Word document.


Useful templates from Section B

B4 – Action, Results, Next Step

B5-B8 – Recording Templates

B11 – Monitoring Progress

Close

Print or download the format you want to use. 

If you save the template for use electronically, do so with a name and in a place that means you can find it again.


Before you read the book(s) in this series, the check-list can be used to help:

  • you decide which topics are most important to you immediately
  • your mind prepare for the information and knowledge you will be reading about.

As you read the book(s):

  • the check-list can be used to help you cover the material you want to read
  • the questions in the Word document can be used as headers for creating a set of notes.

After reading the book(s):

  • reflect on the expectations and ideas you have about learning
  • consider how the effects of dyslexia/ SpLD impact on your students
  • assess what you need to know about dyslexia/ SpLD
  • discuss situations with dyslexic/ SpLD students

  • Is there anything you can immediately, easily change that will help your dyslexic/ SpLD students?
  • Are there longer-term or more complex changes that are needed?
  • Do you need senior management to support the changes you want put in place?
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

H6 Check-list for professional people who exercise responsibility or authority 

pdf

pdf docx

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People in positions of responsibility or authority can have far reaching impacts on the lives of others.  These impacts can seriously damage the lives of dyslexic/ SpLD people when there are misunderstandings caused by dyslexia/ SpLD.


The check-list covers:

  • ideas that are taken for granted
  • working with dyslexic/ SpLD people
  • communication
  • stress
  • employers.

The template is an A4 portrait page and can be downloaded as a pdf or Word document.


Useful templates from Section B

B4 – Action, Results, Next Step

B5-B8 – Recording Templates

B11 – Monitoring Progress

Close

Print or download the format you want to use. 

If you save the template for use electronically, do so with a name and in a place that means you can find it again.


Before you read the book(s) in this series, the check-list can be used to help your mind prepare for the information and knowledge you will be reading about.


As you read the book(s):

  • the check-list can be used to help you cover the material you want to read
  • the questions in the Word document can be used as headers for creating a set of notes.

After reading the book, use the check-list to reflect:

  • how willing am I to accept another person’s different way of thinking or doing a task
  • how clearly do I know my own approaches and expectations
  • how readily do I welcome a dyslexic/ SpLD person telling me how they function
  • what possibilities are there in my work for misunderstandings between me and a dyslexic/ SpLD person
  • can I, should I, seek advice and insights from a specialist support provider
  • what will be the impact on a dyslexic/ SpLD person’s life if I work on the basis of what they are telling me?
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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

H7 Check-list for policy-makers, campaigners and media personnel 

pdf

pdf docx

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Dyslexia/ SpLD are experienced in a wide range of different ways by people with these syndromes – there is no one-size-fits-all solution.  Policy-makers, campaigners and media personnel need to  promote policies and approaches that can accommodate the wide range.  They need to appreciate that the approaches that are vital for dyslexic/ SpLD people are also good practice for all.


Most importantly, they need to understand that skilful handing of issues very early in a child’s life and education is morally, emotionally and economically the best possible policy and approach.


This check-list covers:

  • the sphere of influence
  • the wider effects of dyslexia/ SpLD (beyond the core problems)
  • enabling dyslexic/ SpLD people
  • minimising the effects of dyslexia/ SpLD
  • the benefits to society.

The template is an A4 portrait page and can be downloaded as a pdf or Word document.


Useful templates from Section B

B4 – Action, Results, Next Step

B5-B8 – Recording Templates

B11 – Monitoring Progress

Close

Print or download the format you want to use. 

If you save the template for use electronically, do so with a name and in a place that means you can find it again.


Before you read the book(s) in this series, the check-list can be used to help your mind prepare for the information and knowledge you will be reading about.


As you read the book(s):

  • the check-list can be used to help you cover the material you want to read
  • the questions in the Word document can be used as headers for creating a set of notes.

Reflection after reading the book(s) – Do I understand and accept:

  • that what is vital for dyslexic/ SpLD people is good practice for all
  • that there is no cure for dyslexic/ SpLD learnt confusion once the relevant neural networks have become established
  • that the outcome is best when the right approaches (support and teaching) are used early in a child’s life
  • that the above best outcome makes sense economically, morally and emotionally?

What further questions do I have?

How can I engage with dyslexic/ SpLD people to widen my understanding?

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Template  – files for downloading

Instructions

Template format

H8 Check-list for indirect communicators 

pdf

pdf docx

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Indirect communication, from signage to documents, has to be clear for all readers because there is no possibility to question the originator.  There are many ways that indirect communication can lead to confusion – for non-dyslexic/ SpLD people as well as dyslexic/ SpLD people.


Ideally, indirect communication would be trialled with groups of dyslexic/ SpLD people with significantly different profiles of dyslexia/ SpLD.  It is often found that what makes a significant difference for these groups of people also makes indirect communication easier for all.


The check-list covers:

  • principles and design priorities
  • understanding dyslexia/ SpLD
  • imparting information to dyslexic/ SpLD people
  • dyslexia/ SpLD friendly approaches.

The template is an A4 portrait page and can be downloaded as a pdf or Word document.


Useful templates from Section B

B4 – Action, Results, Next Step

B5-B8 – Recording Templates

B11 – Monitoring Progress

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Print or download the format you want to use. 

If you save the template for use electronically, do so with a name and in a place that means you can find it again.


Before you read the book(s) in this series, the check-list can be used to help your mind prepare for the information and knowledge you will be reading about.


As you read the book(s):

  • the check-list can be used to help you cover the material you want to read
  • the questions in the Word document can be used as headers for creating a set of notes.

After reading the book(s) reflect:

  • how important is it that the message or content of your work is clearly understood
  • how do you check it is properly understood
  • do you consult people
  • what are the profiles of dyslexia/ SpLD that will affect how well your message or content is understood?
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